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Dolphin Spirit Blog

Dolphin and Marine Wildlife Boat Trips from Inverness Marina

Not a Good Day For Fish!

A Feast to Be Had!

It was a glorious day to be out on the Moray Firth today... for the most part! As our 4pm passengers found out, the sunshine and calm waters wouldn't last all day, but we had a barrel of laughs riding the waves in the later part of the afternoon regardless, and our passengers took it all in their stride! But when the sun was out, however, a fair number of animals came out to enjoy it, including a few oddities! We came across seals throughout the day, and Charlie and Kesslet made a rather stellar appearance at 12pm, where we got to see them over the course of about 30 minutes in total! We first caught up with them just outside the river, with Charlie the first to poke his mustachioed beak out of the water. He swam some circles as we approached, with mum Kesslet appearing alongside him also. She was busy handling the lovely big salmon she had caught just before we encountered them, and took it with her as she and Charlie made waves out past the Kessock Bridge. We caught up with the pair after doing our tour of the Beauly Firth, just outside of the ICT Stadium. They came very close, passing under the bow from right to left, letting everyone get a great look at them. Also a great look at Kesslet's unfortunate salmon, who by now was nothing but a bundle of pink goo with a tail... gross! We lost them again near Meikle Mee, where the pair had disappeared in the direction of Kilmuir. It wasn't until we came back around to Alturlie Point that the call of "dolphins!" went up again, and we caught our last glimpse as they once again vanished into the depths of the firth. That would be the last we would see of them today, but not the last wildlife to give us a surprise!

Fish Supper, No Chips

The dolphins weren't the only fishermen out on the firth, as we also came across a cheeky Cormorant with a weird and wonderful little eel-like fish in its beak on the 2pm sailing, and lots of other gulls and other birds spent the best part of the calm weather fishing near the surface. Terns, gulls, and even a passing Skua were all caught today at some point with a fishy feast in their beaks! The Arctic Skua, spotted at 4pm, wasn't the only feathered surprise either, as we also saw 4 more gannets on that trip too! The gannets will be breeding around here again, and it won't be long until we see the skies full of brown fledglings, following their pale parents! Autumn must be drawing near once more; oh how time flies! We also had plenty of jellyfish sightings again this morning in the lovely emerald waters of the Inverness Firth; specks of red and blue lit up the depths, undulating on their way. You can see a great shot of one of the huge Lion's Mane jellyfish from today over on our Facebook page! With the neap tides, sightings have been very unpredictable, but the anticipation on every sailing is palpable and very exciting; who knows what we'll see for the rest of the week with this tide!

The Rise of the Falling Tide

The Gruesome Twosome Strike Back!

A rather strange day all in all aboard Dolphin Spirit, but one which saw the return of Kesslet and Charlie to the Kessock Channel twice! We first spotted them in the early morning, just as we came down the Beauly Firth heading towards the Kessock Bridge. They seemed to be waiting for a boat to come out of the marina, before they sneaked into the river for a little bit of low-tide hunting. We lost sight of them after that, not finding them on our way back, so kept our fingers crossed they'd stick around. Thankfully for us, they did a little more than that, and we caught them again at 12pm. The rain was hammering down on the firth, which made sightings difficult, but when dolphins are flying they're a little hard to miss! A lovely breach from Charlie started off the sightings for that trip, out near the cardinal marker off Carnarc Point. The pair came for a short sniff around the boat, clearly hunting something, before vanishing. We kept looking for them on our way back down to the bridge again, and found them milling around the left main leg. We kept on moving, watching them start to hunt again just under the bridge itself; what they were after must have been worth it, because they were certainly going hammer and tongs! We saw them again on their way out as we came back in, near Alturlie Point. Kesslet already had a fish hanging out of her mouth, but Charlie was very much still on the prowl. He hunted a good distance from us for a lovely big salmon, breaching after it and tossing it in the air in a few spectacular displays. Sadly, after that, they were gone. Wonder where they went? 

Stingy Things

We've been keeping tabs on the jellyfish population again, seeing a great increase in the numbers of Lions Mane and Moon jellies recently. They've added a splash of colour to the murky Moray Firth, as well as some interest for the kids when it's a little quiet on the mammal side. They weren't the only stinging thing on the firth today though, as we had to come to the aid of a poorly little bee who landed on our boat! The bee was cared for by guide Krystyna, who protected the poor mite from the wind and rain up her sleeve for an entire trip! She and Sue went on to take the little buzzy buddy back into the marina, where they warmed him up a little and fed him sugar water to help him get his strength back (you can see a video of it over on our Facebook page!). Once he was ready to go, he was released into the potted plants next to the marina, and shortly disappeared when the rain was over. Who says it's just the big wildlife we care about here at Dolphin Spirit?

No-Fin!

Well That's Not a Good Start...!

So with the turn of a new week, we started our recording of sightings from Dolphin Spirit and Mischief for National Whale and Dolphin Watch. Pity that today had to be an anomaly as far as our recent sightings record has gone! An overall quiet day, Dolphin Spirit was unlucky enough to find absolutely zero dolphins at all today, while Mischief's pickings were rather slim up at Chanonry too! Where have all our fins gone?! We still live-tweeted sightings from our sailings as best we could for today, and will be keeping our eyes peeled and fingers crossed for the rest of the week for slightly better sightings! Although, what we've learned over the years is that when the dolphins aren't hogging the limelight, other animals come out to play in their place!

An Otter-ly Different Kind of Day

On 3 out of our 4 sailings today we were lucky enough to see our seals resting out on the mudflats, with what looks like another new youngster to add to the population! With the neap tides, there wasn't a lot of change between the low and rising tide points today, barely enough to cover the mudflats by the end of the day! This meant our seals got to enjoy a lazy Monday, with only a couple of the younger harbour seals sitting in the water. We also had some really good sightings of the otters today too, who appeared on 2 out of 4 trips, and were really quite active! Two young otters (or so it looked by size) were spotted under the Kessock Bridge early this afternoon, and later by the harbour wall on the 2pm. There was a lot of diving and splashing, indicating they must have been hunting while the waters were quiet. We also received report of the first newborn dolphin being spotted at Chanonry today, which is something new and exciting for Mischief to be looking for (and being really careful around!) in the coming weeks! 

Stranger Sightings!

Something Stingy Has Arrived...

That's right, it's that time of year again; the jellyfish have been sighted in the Moray Firth. Like bees and butterflies are the first signs of spring, jellyfish are the Moray Firth's sign of summer! Perhaps drawn in by the two weeks of fantastic, warm climate, the jellies are appearing in decent numbers now from the reaches of Kilmuir in towards the Kessock Channel too. Keep an eye out for these strange, almost alien-like critters just below the surface; they're bright, yellowy-white in colour with a red-pink star like pattern on the top of the bell (or body) of the jellyfish. Last year we had a great many of these animals in the firth, and they provided some vital nourishment for our wayward sunfish visitor. Perhaps this year may see something similar happening.

A Pilot without a Navigator

In our first year, we had some pretty tremendous sightings, though not all of them were bottlenose dolphins. In fact, around August 2015, we were accompanied by an altogether different kind of dolphin; a pilot whale. Pilot whales are not whales like the name suggests, but some of the largest oceanic dolphins, exceeded in size only by the Killer Whale (or Orca), who is also a dolphin. These "whales" are also referred to as "blackfish". Pilot whales are not totally unknown to the Moray Firth, and small groups have been spotted in the past near Cromarty, however, much like other dolphins, lone pilot whales are a strange sight indeed. So when we came across this huge fin following a pod of roughly 7 bottlenoses, we were obviously surprised. The sad fact of the matter is that this was certainly a bad sign; unusual sightings like these are normally not without reason, and many of the whales (true or otherwise) do not make it back out of the Inner Firth. This poor soul was no different. After disappearing into the Beauly Firth with its new friends, the pilot whale reappeared two days later; unfortunately this time it was floating belly-up near Kilmuir. It seems like this individual had gotten lost, and anticipated that following the dolphins may also have meant food. Sadly, it didn't get what it was looking for. Sightings like this just go to show that every day in the Moray Firth is different, and you never know what you'll see next!

White Tails and Wild Hearts

We always talk about the Red Kites and Osprey that hang around the Firth, but did you know there have also been sightings of an even bigger bird? White tailed sea eagles have occasionally been spotted over the Caledonian Canal area and around the Beauly Firth. These large birds are generally confined to the west coast, where they feed on fish and other birds. The sightings we get are typically of juveniles, obvious due to their impressive, white fan-tail. These could be west coast individuals on the move, or possibly even other individuals from a recent east coast reintroduction program. Regardless, they are very impressive to witness, so keep an eye on the sky next time you're out with us!

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